Mining Law Summit

 

Second Annual Mining Law Summit 
October 20, 2017

“Building Capacity for Mineral Development with Native Americans and Indigenous Communities: a Two-Way Street”

 
Sponsored and hosted by The University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law Global Mining Law Program and the Lowell Institute for Mineral Resources.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
Mining industry leaders, Indigenous leaders, public policy makers, and mining thought leaders 

WHEN AND WHERE
October 20, 2017 (8:00 A.M.-4:30 P.M., followed by reception)
University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law
Tucson, Arizona

REGISTRATION
Registration has closed. This event already happened.

CONTACT INFORMATION
Bernadette Wilkinson
Senior Program Coordinator, College Programming & Outreach
(520) 626-1629
bwilkins@email.arizona.edu

Event Details

Keynote Address 

Rebecca Tsosie, Professor of Law, University of Arizona: "Origins and Conceptions of Indian Reservations; an analysis of the Native American cultural view of the reservation as a historic homeland and identification of off-reservation values"
 
Other speakers include:

  • Tracy Bame, Director, Social Responsibility and Community Development, Freeport-McMoRan
  • Luke Danielson, Sustainable Development Strategies Group
  • Miriam Jorgensen, Research Director at the Native Nations Institute and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development
  • Buddy Rocha Jr., Yavapai-Apache Director of Economic Development, Camp Verde Sand and Gravel

The proceedings will be published in the Arizona Journal of Environmental Law & Policy.
 

8–8:30 A.M.: - Registration and coffee
 
8:30–9:30 A.M. - Plenary Speaker: Origins and Conceptions of Indian Reservations; an analysis of the Native American cultural view of the reservation as a historic homeland and identification of off-reservation values. Rebecca Tsosie, Professor of Law, University of Arizona
 
9:45–11:15 A.M. - Success Stories for Economic Development of Natural Resources
Steve Gunderson, Chairman of the Navajo Transitional Energy Company (invited); Buddy Rocha Jr., Yavapai-Apache Director of Economic Development, Camp Verde Sand and Gravel
 
11:30 A.M.–12:15 P.M. - Self determination: The use of mining projects to increase recognition of Indigenous land and resource rights. In most of the world, governments do not recognize Indigenous land and resource rights but mining companies can provide practical recognition of those rights through the planning process for a mining project. The BIA does not necessarily give high priority to Native interests or to sustainability—can expertise be developed? Peter DuBois, PhD candidate, University of Arizona
 
12:15–1 P.M.- Lunch served
 
1–2 P.M. - Educational Opportunities: How can industry and educational institutions respond to the needs of Native American communities in promoting the technical requirements for mineral resource development? Miriam Jorgensen, Research Director at the Native Nations Institute and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development
 
2–3 P.M. - Community Acceptance: Gaining project acceptance from affected Indigenous Communities is a critical component of mineral development, yet potentially one of the most challenging. Further, this interaction may become even more complex with an increasing global focus on performance frameworks such as “Free Prior and Informed Consent.” This presentation provides insights from Freeport-McMoRan mining projects around the world in identifying pitfalls and best practices, overcoming challenges and creating opportunities for mutual benefit. Tracy Bame, Director, Social Responsibility and Community Development, Freeport-McMoRan
 
3–4 P.M  - Transparency: Can agreements with mining developers be structured to allow acceptable transparency? An application of the Model Mineral Development Agreement. Luke Danielson, Sustainable Development Strategies Group
 
4–4:30 P.M. - Questions and comments
 
4:30–5:30 P.M. - Reception in law school lobby

General Registration - $200.00
Student (UA) - No Charge
Student (other) - $50.00
Faculty and Staff - $50.00

Registration has closed. This event has already happened.

LODGING
Details on a hotel room block for conference attendees will be available soon.
 
TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING
Tucson is accessible by air through Tucson International Airport (TUS), approximately 20 minutes from the UA campus.
 
Parking on the UA campus near James E. Rogers College of Law is available in the Park Garage or Highland Garage for $8/day. See the UA map for locations. 

TUCSON

For more to see and do in Tucson, visit http://www.visittucson.org/.
 
WEATHER

Tucson weather in October typically ranges from the fifties overnight to mid-eighties during the day, with relative humidity averaging in the thirties.