Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program Faculty

The faculty at the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy (IPLP) Program are leading scholars in their fields and have decades of experience serving Indigenous communities. Our faculty are leaders both in their academic fields and as legal advocates, producing novel and innovative legal scholarship and promoting the rights of Indigenous communities through legal advocacy. IPLP faculty instill a strong understanding of the legal foundations of federal Indian law, tribal self-determination, and the trust responsibility, informed by developing norms of contemporary international law respecting Indigenous peoples’ human rights.

Message from IPLP Faculty Co-Chair Rebecca Tsosie

I appreciate the vibrant and diverse student body we have at the University of Arizona College of Law. I consider it such a privilege to work with the students at the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy (IPLP) Program and Native American Law Students Association. I value the strong sense of community that exists at our law school and I appreciate the warm and collegial environment that Dean Miller and my outstanding faculty colleagues have created. This is an environment that is truly inclusive, as well as being a hub of intellectual engagement.  

I am very pleased to be part of the IPLP Program and I acknowledge the superb leadership of my colleague, Professor Rob Williams, both at the law school and at the University. The IPLP embodies a commitment to Indigenous self-determination by serving the needs of Indigenous students and communities at all levels for legal education. The rights of Indigenous peoples are increasingly important in global society, but they are complex and involve several systems. The IPLP fosters knowledge about tribal law, Federal Indian law, and International law. Most of all, it honors the Native Nations of this land and the Indigenous peoples throughout the world who are asserting the right to govern themselves and create a more just and sustainable future for the generations to come.

I am honored to be part of the IPLP and look forward to serving University of Arizona students and the communities that we work with.

IPLP Faculty

Robert A. Williams, Jr.

Regents Professor, E. Thomas Sullivan Professor of Law; Faculty Co-Chair, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program

Robert A. Williams, Jr. is the E. Thomas Sullivan Professor of Law at the James E. Rogers College of Law and Faculty
Co-Chair of the University of Arizona Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program. Professor Williams teaches in the areas of federal Indian law, Indigenous human rights, critical race theory, comparative law, and property law. Professor Williams received his B.A. from Loyola College and his J.D. from Harvard Law School.

View Full Bio

Email: lumbee@email.arizona.edu
Office Number: RH 308
Office Phone: (520) 621-5622


Rebecca Tsosie

Regents Professor of Law; Faculty Co-Chair, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program; Special Advisor to the Provost for Diversity and Inclusion

Rebecca Tsosie is Regents Professor of Law at the James E. Rogers College of Law, Faculty Co-Chair of the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program, and Special Advisor to the Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion for the University of Arizona. Professor Tsosie teaches in the areas of cultural property rights, federal Indian law, property law, and environmental law and policy. Professor Tsosie received her B.A. and J.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

View full bio

Email: rebeccatsosie@email.arizona.edu
Office Number: 221
Office Phone: (520) 621-0121


Heather Whiteman Runs Him

Associate Clinical Professor; Director, Tribal Justice Clinic

Heather Whiteman Runs Him joins Arizona Law from the Native American Rights Fund in Boulder Colorado, where she represented tribal clients on water rights and advised clients on claims relating to water, land, and other natural resource issues. Professor Whiteman Runs Him teaches tribal water law and policy and directs the Tribal Justice Clinic. Whiteman Runs Him received her JD from Harvard Law School, her BAFA in studio art and art history from the University of New Mexico, and her AFA in museum studies from the Institute of American Indian Arts.

View full bio

Email: whitemanrunshim@email.arizona.edu
Office Number: RH 304
Office Phone: (520) 626-9762


Melissa L. Tatum

Research Professor of Law

Melissa Tatum is Research Professor of Law at the James E. Rogers College of Law. Professor Tatum teaches in the areas of tribal jurisdiction, tribal courts, and cultural property and sacred places. Professor Tatum received her B.A. from Trinity University and her J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School.

View full bio

Email: mtatum@email.arizona.edu
Office Number: 266
Office Phone: (520) 626-8150


Seanna Howard

Director, International Human Rights Advocacy Workshop; Professor of Practice

Seanna Howard is Professor of Practice at the James E. Rogers College of Law. Professor Howard teaches International Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples and directs the International Human Rights Advocacy Workshop. Professor Howard received her Bachelor of Environmental Studies from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, her LL.B. from the University of Ottawa, Ontario, and her LL.M. from the James E. Rogers College of Law.

View full bio

Email: showard@email.arizona.edu
Office Number: RH 208
Office Phone: (520) 626-8223


James C. Hopkins

Associate Clinical Professor; Affiliated Professor of American Indian Studies and Latin American Studies

James Hopkins is Associate Clinical Professor at the James E. Rogers College of Law. Professor Hopkins teaches international environmental law and is clinical director of the Yaqui Human Rights Project. Profess Hopkins received his B.A. and LL.B. from the University of Toronto, and his LL.M. from Harvard Law School.

View full bio

Email: hopkinsj@email.arizona.edu
Office Number: RH 209
Office Phone: (520) 621-7669


Robert A. Hershey

Professor Emeritus, Of Counsel Galanda Broadman PLLC

Robert Alan Hershey is Professor Emeritus at the James E. Rogers College of Law. Professor Hershey writes on the topic of globalization's impact on Indigenous cultures and the transformation of culture. Professor Hershey received his B.S. from the University of California, Irvine and his J.D. from the James E. Rogers College of Law.

View full bio

Email: hershey@law.arizona.edu
Office Number: RH 207
Office Phone: (520) 621-5677

 


Pilar Thomas

Part-time Professor of Practice, Partner Quarles & Brady LLP

Pilar Thomas is a Part-time Professor of Practice and Of Counsel at Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie. Professor Thomas teaches Indian Energy Law and has extensive practice experience on Indian law, tribal renewable energy project development and finance, tribal economic development, and Indian gaming.

Email: pilar.thomas@quarles.com
Office Phone: (520) 256-6628

View full bio


Marjolaine Olwell

Part-time Professor of Practice

Marjolaine Olwell is Part-Time Professor of Practice at the James E. Rogers College of Law. She has practiced in Canadian aboriginal law and international human rights law. Professor Olwell teaches in the areas of public international law, international human rights law, and comparative law of Indigenous peoples. She received her B.A. and LLB from the Université du Québec à Montréal and her LL.M. from the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program at the James E. Rogers College of Law.

Email: marjolaineolwell@email.arizona.edu

View full bio


Akilah Kinnison

Part-time Professor of Practice

Akilah Kinnison is a Part-time Professor of Practice. She teaches Critical Race Theory. Professor Kinnison's research interests include the application of international human rights law to federal Indian law issues in the United States, including access to health care and repatriation of tangible cultural heritage. Professor Kinnison is an attorney at Hobbs, Straus, Dean & Walker, LLP, a national law firm representing tribal governments and national tribal organizations. Her practice areas include government relations, natural and cultural resource protection, health care and education, and tribal gaming. She holds an LL.M. and a J.D. from the University of Arizona and a B.A. from Davidson College.

Email: AKinnison@hobbsstraus.com

View full bio


NNI Affiliated Faculty

Miriam Jorgensen

Research Director, Native Nations Institute; IPLP Affiliated Faculty

Miriam is Research Director for the Native Nations Institute at the University of Arizona and for its sister program, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. Her areas of specialty are Indigenous governance and economic development, with a particular focus on the ways communities’ governance arrangements and socio-cultural characteristics affect development.

View full bio

Email: mjorgens@u.arizona.edu
Office Number: 803 E. First St.
Office Phone: (520) 626-0664


Stephen Cornell

Professor of Sociology, Faculty Chair of the Native Nations Institute and former director of the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, University of Arizona; IPLP Affiliated Faculty

A political and cultural sociologist, Cornell did his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago. He taught at Harvard University for nine years before moving to the University of California, San Diego, in 1989 and then to the University of Arizona in 1998. In the late 1980s, at Harvard, Cornell and economist Joseph P. Kalt founded the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development; they continue to direct that project today.

View full bio

Email: scornell@email.arizona.edu
Office Number: 803 E. First St.
Office Phone: (520) 626-4393


Tory Fodder

Indigenous Governance Program Manager; Part-time Professor of Practice

Tory Fodder is the Manager of the Indigenous Governance Program and a Part-time Professor of Practice. Dr. Fodder is an emerging scholar in the field of Indigenous law with research interests in international indigenous human rights and policy, critical race theory, Indigenous libertarianism, and Indigenous governance best practices.

View full bio

Email: taf05@email.arizona.edu
Office Number: RH 303
Office Phone: (520) 626-0236


Joseph Kalt

Ford Foundation Professor (Emeritus), International Political Economy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; Faculty Associate, Native Nations Institute; IPLP Affiliated Faculty

Joseph P. Kalt is the Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He also serves as faculty chair of Harvard's Native American Program and co-director of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. He has represented various tribes in the negotiation of contracts, the rewriting of tribal constitutions, the reform of tribal governments, the mediation of disputes, the design of tribal enterprises, and the securing of compensation for treaty violations and land confiscation.

View full bio

Email: joe_kalt@hks.harvard.edu
Office Phone: (617) 495-4966