For the Record: Fellowships, Poetry and Service Awards, Op-Ed's on Twitter, Voting, Sick Leave and More

May 27, 2022

Catch up on recent University of Arizona Law faculty accomplishments.

News 

Atwood Wins Poetry Award from Arizona Attorney Magazine  

Barbara Atwood, the Mary Anne Richey Professor Emerita of Law was named one of Arizona Attorney Magazine's Poetry winners in the May 2022 Issue. Atwood’s three poems, “On the Valley Floor,” “Near Luang Prabang,” and “On the Trail to Hope Lake,” were all featured in the magazine’s creative arts competition winner's issue.  


Bambauer Named Antitrust and Competition Law and Policy Fellow, Publishes in UC Davis Law Review 

Professor of Law Jane Bambauer has been named one of Innovators Network Foundation’s (INF) inaugural Antitrust and Competition Law Fellows. INF aims to inform and enrich the debate around competition policy by supporting the views and thought leadership of academics and experts in antitrust and adjacent policy fields.  

Bambauer’s recent article, “When a Small Chance Makes a Big Difference: Algorithmic Fairness Among Similar Individuals,” co-written with Tal Zarsky and Jonathan Mayer, was also published in the April 2022 issue of the UC Davis Law Review. The article explores the issue of fairness when a small difference in inputs causes an algorithm to treat two people differently.  


Glennon Writes Discusses Dead Pools for The Conversation

In a column written for The Conversation, University of Arizona Regents Professor Emeritus and Morris K. Udall Professor of Law & Public Policy Robert Glennon explains what happens when water in a reservoir such as Lake Powell or Lake Mead drops so low that it can no longer flow downstream from the hydroelectric dam holding it in. 


Milczarek-Desai Writes Op-Ed on Sick Leave in LA Times, Presents at Various Conferences 

Shefali Milczarek-Desai, associate clinical professor of law, writes for an op-ed piece in The Los Angeles Times titled, “The U.S. needs paid sick leave. Here’s how to get it right.” The article argues that rather than simply replicating existing state and local paid sick leave policies in a federal proposal, lawmakers need to focus on the vulnerable workers routinely left out of sick leave policy. 

Milczarek-Desai was also a presenter at several conferences throughout the month of May. On May 10, she gave a talk on "Representing Workers Through the NLRB Administrative Process," at the AALS Clinical Conference. She also presented, "Workers' Rights, Paid Sick Leave, and Immigrant Workers," on May 11 at the International Conference on Immigration and was a participant in a panel discussion after screening of the award-winning documentary film, Soledad, at the Orange County Orange County Jewish Coalition for Refugees panel on May 12. 


Sepe Co-Authors Op-Ed on Twitter Asset Managers’ Political Influence in Newsweek 

Simone M. Sepe, professor of law and finance, co-authored an opinion piece in Newsweek with Saura Masconale, University of Arizona assistant professor in the Department of Political Economy and Moral Science, questioning if Elon Musk will challenge asset managers’ political influence, following Musk’s plans to acquire Twitter.  


Sundareshan Writes Opinion Piece on Voting in Arizona Daily Star 

Director of the Natural Resource Use and Management Clinic Priya Sundareshan writes an op-ed in the Arizona Daily Star on voting and the Arizona Fair Elections Initiative.


Gast Awarded for Service to the Pima County Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Division 

Chris Gast, senior director for Student Resources, was recognized by the Pima County Bar Association for his two years of service as the President of the Young Lawyers Division. His term ends on May 31. 


In the Media 

Humans vs. Machines 
Villanova Magazine 
Spring 2022 

Law Professor Derek Bambauer's new study co-authored with Michael Risch, vice dean of Villanova’s Charles Widger School of Law, explores whether consumers want people or algorithms to make their day-to-day decisions. 

Arizona gets the U.S. Supreme Court's OK to execute a possibly innocent man 
The Arizona Republic 
May 24, 2022 

In a 6-3 ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday voted in favor of Arizona, which argued federal judges can't determine guilt of people for state crimes – even if there is proof of innocence. Sylvia Lett, an associate clinical professor of law at the University of Arizona, called the ruling “illogical.”  

US Supreme Court agrees with Arizona on death penalty cases, a blow to prisoners trying to prove innocence 
The Arizona Republic 
May 23, 2022 

The U.S. Supreme Court voted in favor of Arizona in Shinn v. Ramirez, which argued that federal judges can't determine guilt of people for state crimes — even if there is proof of innocence. Assistant Clinical Professor of Law Sylvia Lett weighs in. 

What would Republican candidates for governor do to secure Arizona's border with Mexico?
The Arizona Republic
May 19, 2022

Lynn Marcus, director of the Community Immigration Law Placement Clinic discusses proposals to secure the US-Mexico border from prominent Republican candidates for governor in Arizona.

Proposal to eliminate mandatory testing requirement for law school admissions 
YouTube (Scripps National) 
May 17, 2022 

A committee within the American Bar Association is recommending that law schools eliminate mandatory testing as part of their admission process. University of Arizona Law Dean Marc Miller weighs in. 

Bar Association considering changes to law school admissions 
KGUN (Scripps National)  
May 18, 2022 

A committee within the American Bar Association is recommending that law schools eliminate mandatory testing as part of their admission process. University of Arizona Law Dean Marc Miller weighs in. 

Robophobia: Great New Law Review Article – Part 1 
JD Supra  
May 17, 2022 

This column reviews University of Arizona law professor Andrew Keane Woods' recent entry in the University of Colorado Law Review "Robophobia," which takes an in-depth look at human prejudice toward smart computer technologies and its policy implications. 

Do Law Schools Need Standardized Tests?: The Morning Minute 
Law.com 
May 11, 2022 

The ABA council is set to consider doing away with Standard 503, which requires law schools to use standardized testing as part of their admissions processes. University of Arizona Law Dean Marc Miller weighs in.  

'Fascinating Moment': ABA's Potential Nixing of Law School Admissions Test Requirement Raises Hope—and Skepticism 
Law.com 
May 10, 2022 

The ABA council is set to consider doing away with Standard 503, which requires law schools to use standardized testing as part of their admissions processes. University of Arizona Law Dean Marc Miller weighs in. 

What happens to abortion rights in Arizona if Supreme Court overturns Roe V. Wade? 
KVOA 
May 5, 2022 

University of Arizona Law Professor Barbara Atwood discusses what could happen in Arizona if the Supreme Court overturns Roe V. Wade 

Arizona Could have Dueling Abortion Laws 
KOLD 
May 4, 2022 

University of Arizona Law Professor Barbara Atwood discusses what could happen in Arizona if the Supreme Court overturns Roe V. Wade. 

Will Colorado River shortages limit water use? Arizona cities seek 'culture change' first 
The Arizona Republic 
May 4, 2022 

University of Arizona Law Professor Robert Glennon weighs in on if Arizona’s cities should impose restrictions on water use if the Colorado River flow continues to decline. 

NLRB GC Instructs Regions to Shield Immigration Status Info 
Law360 
May 2, 2022 

Shefali Milczarek-Desai, co-chair of the Bacon Immigration Law & Policy Program at University Arizona Law, speaks to Law360 following the National Labor Relations Board's general counsel's orders to protect immigration status info.